Spicy Honey Roasted Chickpeas

Carrots and Cake, Nita Sharda

Seasoned and roasted to perfection!

As you can likely tell from the few posts I’ve had since the birth of this blog, I’m a HUGE proponent of sourcing plant based foods as a source of protein. Where do I begin? Beans, legumes, lentils and nuts are packed with protein and heart healthy nutrients to keep your ticker in top shape!

This particular recipe for roasted chickpeas is ridiculously easy and incredibly tasty. What more do you want out of a recipe,  like really? If you’re new to beans, you can purchase them dry and boil until tender. Inspect your dried chickpeas before cooking, throwing out those that are shriveled or have broken skin. You might find some pebbles or twigs which can be discarded. For every cup of chickpeas, soak with 3 cups water. Chickpeas need to be soaked for at least four hours or preferably for 8 hours. To keep things easy, soak them overnight. Throw out the soaking water by putting chickpeas into a strainer and rinsing them well. This washes away the carbohydrates and sugars that cause gas. For more information on chickpeas, check out this article from Eat Right Ontario.

Or, you can easily find canned versions. If you’re going this route, be sure to rinse them thoroughly. Either way, ensure you allow enough time for the chickpeas to completely dry out, otherwise they may not roast nicely for this recipe.

I typically stash these in an airtight container in the fridge and nibble on the chickpeas a little bit at a time. Another way to enjoy this recipe is by tossing them onto a salad. They offer an added “kick” to any salad and a pretty awesome crunch.

5.0 from 1 reviews
Spicy Honey Roasted Chickpeas
 
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Ingredients
  • 1 28oz can chickpeas
  • 2 Tbsp canola oil
  • 2 tsp cumin
  • 2 tsp paprika
  • 1 tsp garlic powder
  • Pinch of black pepper
  • 1 Tbsp honey (or agave nectar)
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
  2. Drain, rinse and dry the chickpeas. You can also use a salad spinner to help them dry a bit faster.
  3. Mix the cumin, paprika, garlic powder and black pepper into the oil. Stir honey into this mixture.
  4. Toss this dressing onto the chickpeas until evenly coated.
  5. Spread the chickpeas in an even layer on a rimmed baking sheet and bake until crisp, about 30 to 40 minutes. Check up on your chickpeas every 10 minutes and roll them around with a spatula.
  6. And, enjoy!

 

Carrots and Cake, Nita ShardaCarrots and Cake, Nita Sharda

            – With Love, Carrots and Cake,

Carrots and Cake Nita Sharda

Smashin’ Potatoes

 

Carrots and Cake, Nita Sharda

Smashed potatoes topped with Jalapeno Monterey Jack cheese

I’ve mentioned in a previous post, in our home we are not carb-phobics (intense fear of carbohydrates). Instead, we fully embrace carbohydrates as the primary source of energy for our body and brain.  In my practice I help misinformed clients understand the role of carbohydrates in a healthy diet and often spend time educating them on the wonderful benefits carbs offer. Typical carb foods can be rich in fibre, folate and iron.  You may even be surprised to know that 45 to 65 per cent of your daily calories should be coming from carbohydrate sources, especially if you’re an active person!

…we fully embrace carbohydrates as the primary source of energy for our body and brain…

Growing up, my primary “carb food” came in the form of an Indian flatbread known as roti. Other families may rely on rice, bread or potatoes as their main “carb” source. After living independently and being able to experiment in my own kitchen, I often gravitate towards whole grain breads, white and sweet potatoes, brown rice, soba noodles and whole grain pasta.

Onto the important stuff.

Here’s an easy peasy take on baby potatoes. Being a cheese lover, I decided to top these babies with Manitoba proud, Bothwell Cheese…the Cadillac of all cheeses (in my opinion).

Carrots and Cake, Nita Sharda

Smash (gently) prior to baking.

Carrots and Cake, Nita Sharda

Remember, purchasing local foods helps to sustain our economy and flourish our communities.

Smashin' Potatoes
 
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Serves: 3-4
Ingredients
  • 1lb Baby Potatoes
  • 2 tsp Canola Oil
  • 1 tbsp salt free seasoning (Greek, Italian, plain parsley etc)
  • Dash of cracked black pepper
  • ⅓ cup grated cheese (optional, use dairy free if vegan)
Instructions
  1. Bring pot of water to boil. Add in potatoes, and cook until fork tender.
  2. Drain water from the potatoes and line on a baking sheet that has been drizzled with the oil.
  3. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
  4. Smash each potato using a potato masher, your hand or even a fork.
  5. Bake for 15 minutes. Top with cheese, bake for another 2 minutes.

        – With Love, Carrots and Cake,

Carrots and Cake Nita Sharda

Black Bean & Corn Enchiladas

More than any other type of cuisine, I must admit I adore Mexican inspired dishes. Perhaps in a previous life I was a Latin woman or this may all be thanks to a dear friend of mine, who happens to be part Mexican. Either way, it’s a win win situation.

I first discovered this recipe in the coveted Dietitians of Canada Cook! cookbook. I love that it’s a meatless dish and nicely pairs black beans and cheese, without it being too heavy. It’s also super easy to adapt. I’ve added a variety of other vegetables that I have on hand like diced zucchini or left over sweet potato cubes.
Give the recipe a try and don’t forget to leave a comment!

Espero que tengas un buen día.

Carrots and Cake Nita ShardaI paired this dish with a simple guacamole and a side of corn tortilla chips proudly made in Manitoba (courtesy of La Cocina Foods). When time permits, it’s also very nice with a fresh salsa and chopped cilantro.

5.0 from 1 reviews
Black Bean & Corn Enchiladas
 
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Serves: 5 - 6
Ingredients
  • 1 tsp canola oil
  • 1 ½ cups chopped red bell peppers
  • 1 cup chopped onion
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 plum tomatoes, coarsely chopped
  • 1 can (19 oz) black beans, drained and rinsed
  • ½ cup thawed frozen corn kernels
  • 1 tsp chili powder
  • ¼ tsp freshly group black pepper
  • 8 8" whole wheat flour tortillas
  • 2 tbsp butter
  • 2 tbsp all-purpose flour
  • 1 cup vegetable broth
  • ½ cup light sour cream
  • 1 cup shredded Monterey Jack or Cheddar cheese
  • ¼ cup chopped cilantro
Instructions
  1. In a nonstick skillet, heat oil over medium heat. Saute red peppers and onion for 4 to 5 minutes or until softened. Add garlic and sauté for 30 seconds. Stir in tomatoes, beans, corn, chili powder and pepper.
  2. Divide bean mixture evenly among tortillas. Roll up burrito-style and place seam side down in prepared baking dish. Set aside.
  3. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
  4. In a small saucepan, melt butter over medium heat. Whisk in flour and sauté for 30 seconds. Gradually whisk in broth and bring to a boil, whisking the entire time until thick—about 2 – 3 minutes. Remove from heat and stir in sour cream. Pour sauce over tortillas and sprinkle with cheese.
  5. Bake in preheated oven for 20 minutes or until cheese is melted and sauce is bubbling.
  6. Garnish with cilantro.

Carrots and Cake Nita Sharda

Just drizzle…

Carrots and Cake Nita Sharda

Never, ever, ever forget about the guacamole.

 

       – With Love, Carrots and Cake,

Carrots and Cake Nita Sharda

Off the Farm, In the City

Chilly outside, cozy inside.

Chilly outside, cozy inside.

I love Winnipeg, but as a self-proclaimed foodie it can be challenging to source locally-grown food given our northern climate. Though I may have to rely on California for my broccoli, and thank Chile for my grapes, I know I can always rely on our hard-working dairy farmers for local milk. When I spoke about my Food Philosophy I shared that I enjoy drinking dairy milk and nibbling cheeses.  For me, milk is nostalgia at its finest. Thanks to my mom, I have childhood memories gulping homemade lassi made with milk and yogurt—yum.

Where am I going with this?

I wanted to reflect on a wonderful event that connected me to local dairy producers, held at Thom Bargen Coffee & Tea (Must. Go. Back.). While sipping on lattes, guests listened to dairy farmer Henry Holtmann speak about the important roles farmers play in their communities. In addition to his talk being educational, it was endearing to hear Henry talk about the way in which he nourished and cared for his cows. I can say with confidence that our fine dairy farmers commit their daily lives to bring safe milk of the highest quality to our tables.
Carrots and Cake mingling_CnCPeople listening_CnC
Oh, I can’t forget about the delectable treats made by Winnipeg’s very own French bakery, A l’epi de Ble! The lemon tarts were my favorite!

They tasted as good as they look.

They tasted as good as they look.

Bite size pieces of heaven.

Bite size pieces of heaven.

Events like this can’t take place without the champions that host them. A big hip-hip-whooray to the folks at Grazing in the Field for finding an innovative way to bring the farm to our homes. I cannot stress the importance of supporting our local producers—think of it as an investment for the future of our communities.

For more information on upcoming Grazing in the Field events, click here.
Beautiful photography by Cory Aronec.

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Ready or not…

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I’ve dwindled the thought of starting this project for nearly five years. FIVE YEARS. I’ve spent five years mostly procrastinating, but also trying to determine what this would all be about. In the last few months I’ve realized that perhaps all along the only thing that was stopping me was fear. Fear of failure, fear of the unknown, fear of opening myself up and being vulnerable.

This is how I'm currently feeling

This is how I’m currently feeling

With help and encouragement from my family and friends, I’ve mustered up the strength to dive in. So after five years I’m still not all too sure what this blog will contain. But I can tell you this: I hope this platform offers my clients and readers a chance to reflect not only on the foods they eat, but how and why they eat. It is my sincere aim to provide readers with opportunities to learn more about our food, where it comes from and how it’s properties can nourish our body (or not).

And most importantly, I hope that sharing my experiences will serve as a connection to me as both a Dietitian and a “normal” person.

More than this being a place for my readers to gain access to recipes and information, I also anticipate there will be moments when my heart is heavy and I will just to need vent frustrations I have with my career in being a Dietitian. Though I may not write things in the most “lady-like” manner, I hope it will encourage people to be naturally curious but also critical about our food. Lastly, what foodie-nutrition blog wouldn’t be complete without the opportunity to dispel some silly nutrition myths. Bam!

So here I come cyber universe.

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